Announcements

Code switching and language alternation

A colleague writes to ask:

I read your article ‘Code Switching’ in Sociocultural Linguistics. What I wonder is [why] you didn’t write something about the author Grosjean (1982, Life with Two Languages). He also used the term Code Switching as one of the first. And I can’t get the differences between ‘ language alternation’ and ‘ code switching’? Can you describe the differences?

These are excellent questions.

Web Guru Intro: Alex Enkerli

Now that we’re getting deeper into 2010 and some dust has settled, it might be a good opportunity for me to introduce myself to you.

My name is Alex Enkerli and I define myself as an “informal ethnographer.” My background is indeed in linguistic anthropology, at least in part, but I’ve been involved in a variety of other ethnographic fields including ethnomusicology and folkloristics.

Language, Culture and History Conference

Vedawoo Recreation Area
Language, Culture and History conference
Call for Papers, Abstracts due March 1

Official Website: http://uwadmnweb.uwyo.edu/anthropology/info.asp?p=19234


Department of Anthropology
Co-sponsored by the journal Ethnohistory
University of Wyoming
July 1-2, 2010

Potential Search for a Linguistic Anthropologist

January 23, 2010 No Comments admin Announcements ,

The Department of Anthropology at Georgia State University seeks nominations for a linguistic anthropologist at the rank of assistant or associate professor to join a university-wide and interdisciplinary research initiative on “Language and Culture.” The candidate’s research foci must include language acquisition and enculturation, communicative development in cultural contexts, and cross-cultural approaches to linguistic capacity, learning, and performance.

Grad student SLA representative to AAA Student Rep Caucus [Update: Found]

January 23, 2010 No Comments admin AAA, Announcements , ,

[Update: a student representative has been found] The AAA is creating a Student Representative Caucus and wishes to include representatives from the various sections. Although SLA does not have a student representative on it board, we’ve been invited to appoint a student to the caucus who is interested in representing our wing and communicating to other SLA students about the caucus’s and AAA’s activities. Please see the description below of the caucus’ makeup and activities, from its chair, Jason Miller. We have been given a very narrow window in which to nominate such a representative for this year. If you

Joint Call for Papers for Society for Linguistic Anthropology and Council on Anthropology and Education

January 12, 2010 1 Comment Leila Uncategorized , , ,

Charting Multilingual Confluences within Education Eric Johnson (ejj AT tricity.wsu.edu) Building on the “Circulation” theme for the 2010 AAA meetings, the committee on Multicultural and Multilingual Education within the Council on Anthropology & Education would like to invite presentation proposals to be considered for participation on an “Invited” session panel. The general aim of this panel is to emphasize the multifaceted and dynamic nature of language within contexts surrounding education. The following questions represent potential avenues of inquiry for this session: 1. How do languages co-exist and circulate within a classroom, school, or district? 2. Are languages viewed in terms

A quick overview of sign languages

January 5, 2010 4 Comments Leila Uncategorized

Basic Background:

Sign languages are different from both spoken languages and from each other. There is no universal sign language. Because Deaf people can’t hear the spoken language of the country, a sign language like American Sign Language has a different grammar from spoken language. It is also different from other sign languages—even British Sign Language—because of the separate histories of American and British Deaf communities. Sign languages are also not spelled out words, although fingerspelling can be used if you want to translate a written words like the name of an unfamiliar town into sign language.

Constructed languages on film

December 19, 2009 4 Comments Chad Nilep Uncategorized ,

According to Ben Zimmer, various aliens in Star Wars spoke Quechua, one of the most widely spoken indigenous languages in South America, and Haya, a Bantu language spoken in Tanzania.
The new film Avatar features Na’vi, a constructed language said to “out-Klingon Klingon.”