AN column: “Free Speech” in Times of Conflict by Lise M. Dobrin and Eve Danziger

Lessons from Charlottesville Since the violent events that took place in Charlottesville, VA, this past August, when a white supremacist rally led to the killing of a peaceful counter-protester, there has been a lot of reflection in the media and among legal scholars on the problem of free speech. Does the right to speak still call for protection when people are not only shouting incendiary racist slogans, but brandishing weapons as they do so? Where is the line between speaking one’s mind and forms of expression that impinge on the freedom of others? Trying to make sense of a shrouded Confederate statue in

AN column: The Storm after Maria by Sherina Feliciano-Santos

Puerto Rican Aftermath Puerto Ricans are US citizens. Puerto Rico is a colony. The tensions encompassed by these two facts were extremely clear in the federal response to Hurricane Maria. Eric Feliciano-Santos September 20, Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico. That morning, at around 8:00 a.m., I texted the latest coordinates and predictions of when Maria would leave the Island to my mother and brother. My brother replied. “Ok gracias.” September 21, my social media feeds exploded. We all knew so little. The diaspora wanted any news, any detail that could give us an inkling of insight into our

Adam Hodges’s 2017 “Trumped Up Words” columns

Please see the following for an end-of-year index of Adam Hodges’s Trumped Up Words columns on the Anthropology News website. Adam assures us there are more to come in 2018!  As a reminder, you may wish to download any column you plan to use in the future; AN columns are generally moved to AnthroSource after 3-4 months and may be difficult to access and/or behind a paywall. Rescuing Ourselves from the Argument Culture (December) http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/2017/12/05/rescuing-ourselves-from-the-argument-culture/  Responsibility and Evidence in Trumpian Discourse (November) http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/2017/11/03/responsibility-and-evidence-in-trumpian-discourse/ The Paranoid Style of Climate Change Denial (October) http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/2017/10/11/the-paranoid-style-of-climate-change-denial/ Wrestling with ‘The Donald’ (September) http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/2017/09/05/wrestling-with-the-donald/ A Bully in

SLA Business Meeting Report

Society for Linguistic Anthropology Business Meeting Ilana Gershon December 2nd, 2017 President’s Report  SLA Interdisciplinary Public Engagement Award This funds conference submissions beyond the AAA Annual Meeting, and provides travel reimbursement up to $500 per person/$4,000 annually. There will be a 2–3 year trial period. Please keep an eye out early next year for the 2018 Call for Proposals for 2019 conferences. Changes to SLA’s Temporal Rhythms SLA will begin to have board meetings at their Spring meetings. The meetings may not occur every year. There was a widespread consensus that the second SLA spring meeting will occur in 2020.

SLA at the AAAs

September 30, 2017 No Comments annab Anthropology News Columns, SLA Section News

SLA Invited & Co-Sponsored Sessions & Meetings Thursday, November 30 4:15 PM – 6:00 PM  –  SLA graduate student paper contest: Semiotic processes across scale media, and voice – Omni, Cabinet 6:30 PM – 8:15 PM  –  Taking Action in Troubled Times: Learning and Engaging with Shirley Brice Heath – Marriott, Balcony A Friday, December 1 7:30 AM – 8:45 AM  –  Society for Linguistic Anthropology (SLA) Board Meeting – Marriott, Park Tower 8219 12:15 PM – 1:30 PM  –  Society for Linguistic Anthropology (SLA) & AAA Committee for Human Rights (CfHR) Language and Social Justice Task Force Meeting – Marriott, Wilson A 2:00 PM – 3:45 PM  –  Toward a transdisciplinary coalition in sociocultural linguistics: A collaborative analysis of

AN News: Right-wing Politics in Brazil: Iconization and Accusations of Corruption

May 14, 2017 No Comments ilana AAA, Anthropology News Columns, SLA Section News

Anthropology News Column by Aaron Ansell In late 2016, I noticed a peculiar convergence between Brazilian and US politics. In both countries, the political right spurred mass mobilization against a ruling center-left party through the demonization of leading women as corrupt. While neither Senator Hillary Clinton (US) nor President Dilma Rousseff (Brazil) were indicted on criminal charges, these accusations helped to bring about drastic changes in each country’s government. In Brazil, where I’ll focus my attention here, popular allegations of Rousseff’s corruption had previously emboldened the congress to impeach her based on “an eclectic bunch of reasons” often having nothing

Interview with Richard Bauman, part 2

April 24, 2017 No Comments ilana AAA, Anthropology News Columns, SLA Section News

March 7, 2017 Richard Bauman chatted with Ilana Gershon over coffee about his career upon receiving the Franz Boas Award for Exemplary Service to Anthropology.  Below is the second part of an edited transcript of the informal conversation. In recent years, you have been turning to the study of media, and in particular to how people had to transform genres as they transitioned from performing in front of audiences to making early commercial sound recordings. How has studying media affected your understanding of performance? Coming to IU to a department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology, the ethnomusicology graduate students made a

Interview with Richard Bauman, part 1

April 24, 2017 No Comments ilana Anthropology News Columns, SLA Section News

Richard Bauman chatted with Ilana Gershon over coffee about his career upon receiving the Franz Boas Award for Exemplary Service to Anthropology.  Below is the first part of an edited transcript of the informal conversation. Richard Bauman. James Brosher Over the course of your career, you have had many insights that have opened conceptual paths for others around performance, intertextuality, and so on.   Could you talk about the origins for one of your ideas and how your understanding evolved over different research projects, such as entextualization? For me, being part of a closely engaged circle of colleagues has been absolutely

AN News: “Run, Hide, Fight” by Anna M. Babel (The Ohio State University)

December 19, 2016 No Comments annab Anthropology News Columns, Uncategorized

Anthropology News Column On campus violence, language, and the climate of fear. Monday was my birthday. I was taking a walk along the river near my house when my phone buzzed. I figured it was a birthday message, but instead it was a security alert from the campus emergency system. “Take cover,” it said. “Shelter in place, wait for additional information.” A few moments later, another message arrived: “Active shooter on campus. Run, hide, fight.” The name of a campus building and an address followed. I walked back home and turned on the local news. There was no more information on

AN News: “Detention, Disappearance, and the Power of Language” by Miranda Cady Hallett and Lynnette Arnold

November 15, 2016 No Comments annab Anthropology News Columns, Uncategorized

Anthropology News Article By Miranda Cady Hallett (U of Dayton) and Lynnette Arnold (U Mass-Amherst) During the 20th century, military dictatorships in Latin America became notorious for kidnapping and torturing their citizens. Because many of those kidnapped never returned, family members began to name and denounce this repression as ‘disappearance,’ coining the term los desaparecidos (the disappeared) to discursively highlight the systematic nature of this form of state violence. We are in a new era of los desaparecidos, this time perpetrated by the US government against the racialized bodies of immigrants. Immigration law enforcement and deportation in the United States

AN News: “SLA at the 2016 AAA Meeting” by Aaron Ansell and Anna Babel

The Society for Linguistic Anthropology (SLA) panels and other events at the upcoming AAA Annual Meeting (November 16-20 in Minneapolis,MN) promise to be exciting ones. Below is a schedule of these events with links to the Full Program on the AAA website. Wednesday, November 16th 2:00 p.m.-3:45 p.m. Affect, Identity, and Language Ideologies (2-0145) Blank Faces (2-0170) Prayer, Poverty, and Song: Cultivating Religious Sound in a Secular World(2-0225) 4:00 p.m.-5:45 p.m. Discourses of Power and the Politics of Discourse (2-0380) Media and the Movement of Language (2-0415) Sticks and Stones: Struggle in Discourse (2-0330)   Thursday, November 17th 12:15 p.m.-1:30

AN News: “The Gap That Won’t Be Filled: An anthropolitical critique of the ‘Language Gap'” by Avineri et. al.

August 29, 2016 1 Comment annab Anthropology News Columns

Anthropology News Article Netta Avineri (Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey), Susan D. Blum (U of Notre Dame), Eric Johnson (Washington State U Tri-Cities), Kathleen C. Riley (Rutgers U), and Ana Celia Zentella (UC San Diego) Is language responsible for poverty? If poor and minority parents spoke like rich white parents, would they too become rich and successful? That’s the impression one gets from the now-familiar discourse about the language gap (or word gap, or 30 million-word gap) between children (of color) on welfare and children of professional (white) parents. This notion of a language gap is based on

AN News: “Difficult Interpretations: Linguistic anthropology and access to social services” by Rusty Barrett (U Kentucky), Hilaria Cruz (U Kentucky), and María Luz García (Eastern Michigan U)

August 23, 2016 No Comments annab Anthropology News Columns

Anthropology News Article Since 2000, any agency receiving government funding is legally obligated to provide clients with access to interpreters who speak their language. However, finding interpreters for indigenous languages can be difficult. Those of us who research languages from Mexico and Central America have become used to regular requests for help finding interpreters. Even so, cases where no adequate interpreter can be found often have dire consequences. A well-known example is the case of Cirila Baltazar (discussed in the second edition of Lippi-Green’s English with an Accent), a Chatino speaker who had her newborn infant taken away by the

AN News: “Interdisciplinary Collaborations around Language and Social Justice” by Jonathan Rosa (Stanford University) and Netta Avineri (Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey)

July 27, 2016 No Comments aaron Anthropology News Columns, SLA Section News

In recent years, AAA’s Society for Linguistic Anthropology (SLA) has generously supported a range of efforts intended to create interdisciplinary dialogues. In 2014, this support took the form of an Invited Colloquium at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for Applied Linguistics (AAAL), conceived of by then presidents of AAA and AAAL, Monica Heller and Aneta Pavlenko, respectively, and organized by Angela Reyes. Aneta also organized a related roundtable at the 2014 AAA meeting. Both the Invited Colloquium, “Conceptualizing Linguistic Difference: Perspectives from Linguistic Anthropology,” and the roundtable, “Dilemmas and Complexities of Multilingual Fieldwork,” provided forums for SLA members and

AN News: “Charting New Territory: The Intersection of Linguistics and Geography” by Catherine Lee (U Hawaiʻi Manoa)

July 26, 2016 No Comments annab Anthropology News Columns

Anthropology News Column When most people think about linguistic geography, if they think of it at all, they think of dialect atlases such as the Atlas of North American English (Labov et al., 2006). But linguistic geography has the potential to be far more than isoglosses and vowel shifts. At the recent American Association of Geographers (AAG) Annual Meeting in San Francisco, I organized a series of three sessions dedicated to linguistic geography, broadly defined. The presenters in these sessions (follow these links for abstracts for Session 1, Session 2, and Session 3) were a mix of human geographers, linguistic

AN News: “Outreach and Engagement in a Science Museum” by Leslie C. Moore (The Ohio State University) et al.

June 13, 2016 No Comments annab Anthropology News Columns, Uncategorized

Anthropology News Column In recent years, several sociolinguists have published accounts of successful integration of Outreach and Engagement into their research and/or teaching, including outreach to middle and/or high school students, university service-learning courses, and meaningful involvement of students in research as participants. We have found it exciting and effective to engage with the public through informal science education in a science museum. In 2012, the Language Sciences Research Lab opened at the Center of Science and Industry (COSI) in Columbus, Ohio. The lab is better known as the Language Pod, a research-in-real-time exhibit that consists of a glass-enclosed room

AN News: “Communicating Bodies: New Juxtapositions of Linguistic and Medical Anthropology” by Charles L. Briggs (U California, Berkeley) and Paja Faudree (Brown U)

Linguistic anthropology and medical anthropology are growth areas of anthropology, yet research across these two fields has been relatively limited. Recently medical and linguistic anthropologists have shifted from viewing language, medicine, and science as established objects to documenting the practices, discourses, and technologies through which they are produced. Important developments around the world—including the ascendance of biomedicalization, neoliberal markets for language practices, and new forms of mediatization—invite coordinated attention. Nevertheless, the epistemological commitments of scholars in both subfields have frequently resulted in forms of boundary work that impede fruitful exchanges and cooperation. In 2014, we began bringing together scholars who

AN News: “Taking Full Accountability (but None of the Blame)” by Aaron Ansell (Virginia Tech)

March 14, 2016 No Comments aaron Anthropology News Columns, SLA Section News

Last year, in the midst of a campus mobilization led by Black students that rocked the U of Missouri (“Mizzou”), we caught a glimpse of a particular breed of non-apology, one anchored in Christian neoliberalism and felicitous of white privilege. I’m referring to the November 9th resignation speech of Tim Wolfe, former President of Mizzou. Wolfe’s resignation represented a win for campus activists who through protests, encamped demonstrations, a hunger strike, and a historic strike of many football players, publicized the endemic racial injustice at Mizzou. Here I offer no comment about the protests, the injustices that motivated them, the culpability of Wolfe’s administration,

AN News: “Working at the Border of Sister Disciplines” by Anna Babel (The Ohio State University)

March 11, 2016 No Comments annab Anthropology News Columns

Anthropology News Article One of this column’s areas of focus for the upcoming year is interdisciplinarity in linguistic anthropology. We’re excited to have contributions lined up from colleagues who are crossing disciplinary borders and collaborating with scholars in geography, agriculture, education, medicine and more.  If you are an interdisciplinary scholar, please check out the SLA Interdisciplinary Engagement Conference Fund, which supports participation in conferences beyond the usual linganth venues. I thought we might kick this series off with a practical discussion of the most common, and most fundamental, disciplinary alignment in our field—the convergence and dialogue between linguistic anthropology and

AN News: “A Proposal to Initiate a Spring SLA Meeting” by Michael Silverstein (University of Chicago)

At our recent SLA annual business meeting in Denver, I proposed to the Board and to the membership in attendance that we consider organizing a Spring meeting along the lines of the long-standing and very productive ones of other sections of the American Anthropological Association. Two of our sub-disciplinary “quadrant” (or “quintile”) counterparts, the American Ethnological Society and the Society for Cultural Anthropology, as well as the Society for Psychological Anthropology, have long had either annual or biennial meetings, frequently held jointly with one or more smaller organizations that have collaborated to highlight a thematic focus especially rewarding as a