Constructed languages on film

December 19, 2009 4 Comments Chad Nilep Uncategorized ,

According to Ben Zimmer, various aliens in Star Wars spoke Quechua, one of the most widely spoken indigenous languages in South America, and Haya, a Bantu language spoken in Tanzania.
The new film Avatar features Na’vi, a constructed language said to “out-Klingon Klingon.”

Call for submissions for the Sapir Prize (2010)

December 14, 2009 No Comments admin Announcements, SLA

The Edward Sapir Book Prize was established in 2001 and is awarded in alternate years to a book that makes the most significant contribution to our understanding of language in society, or the ways in which language mediates historical or contemporary sociocultural processes. The SLA invites books with conceptual and theoretical focus, as well as ethnographic and descriptive works. Single-or multi-author books – but not edited collections – are eligible. Books must have been published in 2008, 2009, or 2010 to be eligible. Any given book is eligible only in one biennial round of competition. Three copies of books submitted

Monkey Grammar?

December 13, 2009 No Comments Leila Uncategorized , , ,

An article passed on by Ken Ehrensal from the New York Times on Campbell’s monkeys having grammar. The grammar is pretty simple but looks like it might be more complex than Vervet monkeys’ efforts. [Link to article.] The full length article it is based on can be found here: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0007808 and discusses the flexibility of monkey calls and the different kinds of calls including “hok” “hok-oo” and “boom.”  Some audio clips accompany the article.

Tell us about your program!

December 8, 2009 2 Comments kerim Announcements

One of the new website features we are very excited about is the new Program Directory. We hope this will become the most reliable place on the internet to learn about colleges, graduate schools and summer programs offering courses in linguistic anthropology. But this directory won’t build itself! If you teach or study linguistic anthropology, take a moment to go to our submission form and let us know about your program. Thank you!

Still learning from Dell Hymes

December 8, 2009 No Comments Chad Nilep AAA

I was particularly moved by a memorial at the Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association for Dell Hymes. Hymes founded the ethnography of speaking, developed the concept of communicative competence, and pioneered the study of ethnopoetics.

The AAA Meetings were a great success

December 7, 2009 1 Comment Leila Uncategorized , , ,

Welcome back home! The Philadelphia meetings were a great success and it was wonderful to see so many old friends and colleagues. The Society for Linguistic Anthropology meeting was standing room only. The SLA organization as a whole is very healthy with an expanding journal and more sessions this year than last year, including four invited sessions. This updated website was enthusiastically received by the membership. Now is the time, though, to convert enthusiasm into words and actions…Please submit summaries of your sessions, news about your recent books and publications, essays on questions important to language and culture or other

15th ANNUAL CONFERENCE on Language, Interaction, and Social Organization University of California, Santa Barbara May 14-16, 2009*

May 7, 2009 No Comments Diego Arispe-Bazán (SLA Web Assistant) Announcements, SLA

Conference Announcement, Conference Registration Now Open 15th ANNUAL CONFERENCE on Language, Interaction, and Social Organization University of California, Santa Barbara May 14-16, 2009* The annual conference promotes interdisciplinary research and discussion in the analysis of naturally occurring human interaction. Papers will be presented by national and international scholars on a variety of topics in the study of language, interaction, and culture. The papers primarily employ analysis of naturally occurring data drawing from methodologies that include conversation analysis, discourse analysis, ethnographic methods, ethnomethodology, interactional linguistics, and interactional sociolinguistics. 2009 Plenary Speakers: Amy Kyratzis Education, University of California, Santa Barbara Lourdes de

Student Paper Prizes in Linguistic Anthropology Competitions for both Graduate and Undergraduate Students

April 19, 2009 No Comments Diego Arispe-Bazán (SLA Web Assistant) Announcements, SLA

The Society for Linguistic Anthropology announces a competition for Outstanding Paper by a Student, one each at both undergraduate and graduate levels.  To be eligible for this award, an applicant must have been either a graduate or undergraduate (in a degree-granting program) when the paper was written, must be the sole author of the paper, and must submit the paper no more than two years after it was written. The paper should be an original work, based on research conducted by the author.  It will be evaluated on the basis of its clarity, significance to the field, and substantive contribution.

AAA 2009: SLA Call for Invited Sessions

February 6, 2009 No Comments Diego Arispe-Bazán (SLA Web Assistant) Announcements, SLA

Dear Linguistic Anthropologists, It’s that time of year again:  The Society of Linguistic Anthropology (SLA) invites your submissions for the American Anthropological Association’s 108th Annual Meeting, to be held in Philadelphia, PA, on December 2-6, 2009.  As this year’s SLA Section Program Editor, I am writing to encourage you to submit invited sessions, volunteered sessions, and volunteered papers and posters so that we can have an exciting meeting in Philadelphia this December.  The theme of the 2009 Meeting is “The End/s of Anthropology.”  I hope that you will consider orienting your panels to the conference theme (see below), although you

Call for submissions for the Sapir Prize

February 27, 2008 3 Comments alex Announcements, SLA

The Edward Sapir Book Prize was established in 2001 and is awarded in alternate years to a book that makes the most significant contribution to our understanding of language in society, or the ways in which language mediates historical or contemporary sociocultural processes. The SLA invites books with conceptual and theoretical focus, as well as ethnographic and descriptive works. Single-or multi-author books – but not edited collections – are eligible. Books must have been published in 2006, 2007, or 2008 to be eligible. Three copies of books submitted for consideration should be sent to the address below by June 15th.

Invited session deadline postponed

February 27, 2008 No Comments alex AAA, SLA

Dear Linguistic Anthropologists, The Society of Linguistic Anthropology (SLA) has postponed the deadline for invited sessions from Monday, March 3, to Friday, March 7th. We hope that this will enable more of you to get sessions together for submission. The earlier post I sent out regarding the submission process is archived below, in case you missed it. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions about either invited or volunteered session submission. The general AAA deadline for volunteered sessions, papers, and posters remains April 1st. See you in San Francisco, Kira Hall University of Colorado

AAA 2008 Panel Submissions

February 13, 2008 2 Comments alex AAA, SLA

Dear Linguistic Anthropologists,

It’s that time of year again: The Society of Linguistic Anthropology (SLA) invites your submissions for the American Anthropological Association’s 107th Annual Meeting, to be held in San Francisco, CA, on November

Resolution on Language Questions in the US Census

December 2, 2007 No Comments alex Announcements, SLA

Proposed by CfHR Task Group on Language and Social Justice Laura R. Graham, Chair, Ana Celia Zentella, Bonnie Uricioli (With assistance from Terry Turner) Whereas: Anthropology as a profession is committed to the promotion and protection of the right of peoples everywhere to the full realization of their humanity, which is to say their capacity for culture, and whereas As a professional organization of anthropologists, the AAA has long been, and continues to be, concerned whenever human difference is made the basis for a denial of basic human rights, where “human” is understood in its full range of cultural, social,