AN column: “Free Speech” in Times of Conflict by Lise M. Dobrin and Eve Danziger

Lessons from Charlottesville Since the violent events that took place in Charlottesville, VA, this past August, when a white supremacist rally led to the killing of a peaceful counter-protester, there has been a lot of reflection in the media and among legal scholars on the problem of free speech. Does the right to speak still call for protection when people are not only shouting incendiary racist slogans, but brandishing weapons as they do so? Where is the line between speaking one’s mind and forms of expression that impinge on the freedom of others? Trying to make sense of a shrouded Confederate statue in

AN column: The Storm after Maria by Sherina Feliciano-Santos

Puerto Rican Aftermath Puerto Ricans are US citizens. Puerto Rico is a colony. The tensions encompassed by these two facts were extremely clear in the federal response to Hurricane Maria. Eric Feliciano-Santos September 20, Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico. That morning, at around 8:00 a.m., I texted the latest coordinates and predictions of when Maria would leave the Island to my mother and brother. My brother replied. “Ok gracias.” September 21, my social media feeds exploded. We all knew so little. The diaspora wanted any news, any detail that could give us an inkling of insight into our

Adam Hodges’s 2017 “Trumped Up Words” columns

Please see the following for an end-of-year index of Adam Hodges’s Trumped Up Words columns on the Anthropology News website. Adam assures us there are more to come in 2018!  As a reminder, you may wish to download any column you plan to use in the future; AN columns are generally moved to AnthroSource after 3-4 months and may be difficult to access and/or behind a paywall. Rescuing Ourselves from the Argument Culture (December) http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/2017/12/05/rescuing-ourselves-from-the-argument-culture/  Responsibility and Evidence in Trumpian Discourse (November) http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/2017/11/03/responsibility-and-evidence-in-trumpian-discourse/ The Paranoid Style of Climate Change Denial (October) http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/2017/10/11/the-paranoid-style-of-climate-change-denial/ Wrestling with ‘The Donald’ (September) http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/2017/09/05/wrestling-with-the-donald/ A Bully in

AN News: “SLA at the 2016 AAA Meeting” by Aaron Ansell and Anna Babel

The Society for Linguistic Anthropology (SLA) panels and other events at the upcoming AAA Annual Meeting (November 16-20 in Minneapolis,MN) promise to be exciting ones. Below is a schedule of these events with links to the Full Program on the AAA website. Wednesday, November 16th 2:00 p.m.-3:45 p.m. Affect, Identity, and Language Ideologies (2-0145) Blank Faces (2-0170) Prayer, Poverty, and Song: Cultivating Religious Sound in a Secular World(2-0225) 4:00 p.m.-5:45 p.m. Discourses of Power and the Politics of Discourse (2-0380) Media and the Movement of Language (2-0415) Sticks and Stones: Struggle in Discourse (2-0330)   Thursday, November 17th 12:15 p.m.-1:30

AN News: “Communicating Bodies: New Juxtapositions of Linguistic and Medical Anthropology” by Charles L. Briggs (U California, Berkeley) and Paja Faudree (Brown U)

Linguistic anthropology and medical anthropology are growth areas of anthropology, yet research across these two fields has been relatively limited. Recently medical and linguistic anthropologists have shifted from viewing language, medicine, and science as established objects to documenting the practices, discourses, and technologies through which they are produced. Important developments around the world—including the ascendance of biomedicalization, neoliberal markets for language practices, and new forms of mediatization—invite coordinated attention. Nevertheless, the epistemological commitments of scholars in both subfields have frequently resulted in forms of boundary work that impede fruitful exchanges and cooperation. In 2014, we began bringing together scholars who

SLA Anthro News Column

SLA Column for May 2011 Mark Allen Peterson and James Stanlaw Linguistic Moments in the Movies, Part VII By Mark Allen Peterson (Miami U) It’s time for our annual roundup of films and film clips suitable for initiating discussions about language—or just a good laugh at the way the media industry represents language. The Gods Must be Crazy (1981) I went to this film when it first opened in Los Angeles almost thirty years ago, and I loved it. I felt rather guilty a few years later (in 1985), when I read the brilliant review in American Anthropologist by Toby