Features: SLA Section News Articles

On this page, we share articles from the Society for Linguistic Anthropology Section News published in Anthropology News.

If you scroll past the most recent articles you will find an archive of the SLA Section News articles.

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ENDANGERED MINORITIES AND LINGUISTIC PLURALISM IN ITALY

By Stavroula Pipyrou, Published November 21, 2017

In 1999, the implementation of act no. 482 finally created the opportunity to link linguistic minorities in Italy directly with local self-government. After the demarcation of their territories by the provincial councils, the linguistic minorities recognized by act no. 482 were granted the right to use their languages in the field of education both as a medium-language and as a subject in nursery schools, in primary and secondary education, in public meetings, in place names, in the media, and with public administration and judicial authorities. Local populations and institutions were determined to make the most of the newly found recognition that went some way to address the suppression of minority languages rooted in Italy’s era of fascism.

When I first arrived in Reggio Calabria in 2006 to commence a project on minority governance among the Grecanici (Greek-speaking) linguistic minority, it was evident that infrastructure for promoting minority matters was firmly in place (Pipyrou 2016). The first Sportello Linguistico was an important initiative to protect and promote Grecanico language and was inaugurated by the provincia on July 13, 2004. Funding was secured for three such sportelli, operating as cultural and information centers and official mediators between Grecanici and the provincia. The centers organized conferences and seminars; published all manner of material relating to Grecanico language, history, and culture; and employed language teachers. Part of the remit was to pursue links with the Griki of Puglia and other linguistic minorities in Italy and to strengthen relations with Greece, especially Greek cities twinned with Grecanici communities. Finally, in collaboration with the Department of Philology and Linguistics at the University of Messina, the sportelli offered the services of numerous interpreters and translators. The initiative focused on taking a public responsibility for teaching the minority language, rather than it primarily being a family concern.

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HERE’S THE RUB ON THE DOVE SKINCARE AD

October 18, 2017

The latest rendition of “sorry, not sorry” is not just topping the Billboard charts. It is also a public relations anthem about “missing the mark.” This time, Dove skincare is being accused of “tone deafness.” The ad, appearing on Facebook, drew widespread critique. It features a loop of images of three women, each wearing a nude colored shirt to match the model’s skin tone. A black woman removes her shirt to become a white woman, who removes her shirt to become a brown woman, whose undressing returns us to the first of the three models. The company quickly pulled the ad, but not before viewers saved versions of it. One widely circulated screen grab captured a black woman transforming into a white one. Outrage was quickly followed by calls for #BoycottDove on Twitter.

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BONNIE URCIUOLI’S REFLECTIONS UPON RETIREMENT

What article or book that you wrote are you most pleased with?  Could you talk about the story behind writing it?   Or: What article or book was hardest for you to write, and why?

These two questions have the same answer, “Skills and Selves in the New Workplace,” published in AE in 2008. It took years and I sweated blood writing and rewriting and rewriting it, probably because I tried to pack way too much into each draft. I had long been thinking about how the word skill got thrown around as a count noun denoting some kind of plug-in. I was also having an extension on my house built by a very skilled contractor working pretty much by himself. By ‘skilled’ I mean he had been doing this work for decades and knew exactly what he was doing. I wanted to contrast this with the idea of workers and students as future workers imagined as bundles of skills like Lego pieces or Tinkertoys. What kind of corporate ethos comes up with the notion that ‘skills’ as the (supposed) outcome of workshops on ‘leadership’ or ‘communication’ could discursively parallel ‘skill’ as the (concrete) result of years of experience? Who was making money off this? Nor was I thrilled at how students were getting inculcated with this, especially students of color. (Diversity skills? Really?) After starting a draft in 2002, I played with it until 2004 when I figured I might as well send it in and get some useful feedback which I did (including “you’re going where with this now?”). It took a few more revisions over a few more years, not to mention a lot of help (big shout-out to Chaise LaDousa, Ilana Gershon, Virginia Dominguez, and the AE reviewers), to get it over the final hump. But the article was one of the most productive things I ever did, pulling together many many threads for me and apparently for quite a few other people as well.

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RIGHT-WING POLITICS IN BRAZIL: ICONIZATION AND ACCUSATIONS OF CORRUPTION

By Aaron Ansell, Published May 14, 2017

In late 2016, I noticed a peculiar convergence between Brazilian and US politics. In both countries, the political right spurred mass mobilization against a ruling center-left party through the demonization of leading women as corrupt. While neither Senator Hillary Clinton (US) nor President Dilma Rousseff (Brazil) were indicted on criminal charges, these accusations helped to bring about drastic changes in each country’s government. In Brazil, where I’ll focus my attention here, popular allegations of Rousseff’s corruption had previously emboldened the congress to impeach her based on “an eclectic bunch of reasons” often having nothing to do with the formal charges (The Economist 4/18/16).  Here I suggest that anti-Rousseff urban demonstrators, along with a few of my own field consultants in Brazil’s rural hinterlands (Piauí State), convinced one another of Rousseff’s guilt through a meta-communicative process that equated disparate, poorly evidenced aspects of Rousseff’s venality.

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2000s

2009

December 2009. Volume 50. Issue 9. “Learn a Language, Develop Musical Skill” (James Stanlaw), p. 50

November 2009. Volume 50. Issue 8. “Obama’s Health Care Speech- Linguistic Discontent” (James Stanlaw), pp. 55-56

October 2009. Volume 50. Issue 7. “On Heartfelt Commitments and Gifts in Linguistic Anthropology” (Debra Spitulnik), p. 64

No Section News in September 2009. Volume 50. Issue 6.

May 2009. Volume 50. Issue 5. “Linguistic Moments in the Movies” (Mark Allen Peterson), p. 60

April 2009. Volume 50. Issue 4. “Language and Social Justice: Report from the CfHR Task Group” (Laura R. Graham and Ana Celia Zentella), pp. 51-52

March 2009. Volume 50. Issue3. “Tatti Happens- Swearing, Switching and Speaking Cross-Culturally” (Mark Allen Peterson), pp. 55-56

February 2009. Volume 50. Issue 2. “Report on the 2008 SLA Business Meeting” (James Stanlaw), pp. 55-56

January 2009. Volume 50. Issue 1. “What Will Be the Language Policy of the Obama Administration?” (James Stanlaw), pp. 51-52

 

2008

December 2008. Volume 49. Issue 9. “Does the French Language Belong to France?” (Alexandre Enkerli), p. 56

November 2008. Volume 49. Issue 8. “‘Words That Work’ in an Election (if You Don’t Put Descartes before the Horse)” (James Stanlaw), pp. 63-64

No Section News in October 2008. Volume 49. Issue 7.

No Section News in September 2008. Volume 49. Issue 6.

May 2008. Volume 49. Issue 5. “Linguistic Moments in the Movies” (Mark Allen Peterson), p. 67

April 2008. Volume 49. Issue 4. “What Can Gitmo Ditainees Read?” (James Stanlaw), p. 63

March 2008. Volume 49. Issue 3. No Title–2007 Business Meeting. (Mark Allen Peterson and James Stanlaw), pp. 59-60

February 2008. Volume 49. Issue 2. “‘What We Mean When We Say- An Explanation of Estimative Language’- Linguistic Surprises from the Director of National Intelligence” (James Stanlaw), pp. 54-55

No SLA Column in January 2008. Volume 49. Issue 1.

2007

December 2007. Volume 48. Issue 9. “A Linguistic Mstyrey form the Itnernet” (James Stanlaw), pp. 62-63

November 2007. Volume 48. Issue 8. “SLA Meeting Preview” (Kira Hall), pp. 62-63

October 2007: Volume 48. Issue 7. “A Decade of Cognitive Linguistics” (James Stanlaw and Mark Peterson), p. 67

No Section News in September 2007. Volume 48. Issue 6.

May 2007. Volume 48. Issue 5. “Linguistic Moments in the Movies” (Mark Allen Peterson), p. 67

April 2007. Volume 48. Issue 4. “What’s in a Name? Or What Defines a ‘Civil War’ and Who Makes the Definition?” (James Stanlaw), p. 63

March 2007. Volume 48. Issue 3. “Lies, Damn Lies and Political Aids” (Mark Allen Peterson), pp. 58-59

February 2007. Volume 48. Issue 2. “Translations- ‘Internationalizing’ Language and Music in Japan” (Carolyn Stevens), p. 54

January 2007. Volume 48. Issue 1. “SLA Thriving–and Aims to Continue” (Mark Allen Peterson and James Stanlaw), pp. 62-63

 

2006

December 2006. Volume 47. Issue 9. “Don’t Think of an Elephant … or a Donkey” (James Stanlaw), pp. 61-62

November 2006. Volume 47. Issue 8. “SLA in San José” (Mark Peterson and James Stanlaw), pp. 61-62

October 2006. Volume 47. Issue 7. “The DoBeS Program in Action- A Report from Argentina” (James Stanlaw and Mark Peterson) and “The Chaco Languages Project of Argentina” (Lucía Golluscio and Silvia Hirsch), p. 63

No Section News in September 2006. Volume 47. Issue 6.

May 2006. Volume 47. Issue 5. “Bylines as Indexes” (Mark Allen Peterson and James Stanlaw), pp. 61-62

April 2006. Volume 47. Issue 4. “Everett on the Pirahã Language” (James Stanlaw and Mark Peterson), p. 55

March 2006. Volume 47. Issue 3. “Grief, Love and Indices” (Mark Allen Peterson), pp. 54-55

February 2006. Volume 47. Issue 2. “SLA in DC” (James Stanlaw and Mark Peterson), p. 59

January 2006. Volume 47. Issue 1. “I337 5p33k- 4n 31337 I3550n f0r 4n O1d F4r7” (James Stanlaw), p. 62

 

2005

December 2005. Volume 46. Issue 9. “Japanese Girls’ Orthographic Rebellion” (Laura Miller), p. 60

November 2005. Volume 46. Issue 8. “Rough Guide to Language Panels At AAA” (James Stanlaw and Mark Peterson), pp. 62-63

October 2005. Volume 46. Issue 7. “The Language of Two Occupations: Taiwan and Japan; Iraq and America” (Geoff Sant), pp.61-62

No Section News in September 2005. Volume 46. Issue 6.

May 2005. Volume 46. Issue 5. “Untitled” (Mark Allen Peterson and James Stanlaw), pp. 58-59

April 2005. Volume 46. Issue 4. “Language and the Internet: Is it Always English?” (James Stanlaw), pp. 54-55

March 2005. Volume 46. Issue 3. “Report from SLA Business Meeting” (Mark Allen Peterson and James Stanlaw), p. 51

February 2005. Volume 46. Issue 2. “Language, Linguistis and the FBI” (James Stanlaw), pp. 53-54

January 2005. Volume 46. Issue 1. “SLA Panels at the AAA Meeting” (Mark Allen Peterson), p. 55

 

2004

December 2004. Volume 45. Issue 9. “Language and Politics Revisited: The Anti-Chomsky Views” (James Stanlaw), pp. 60-61

November 2004. Volume 45. Issue 8. Untitled (Mark Allen Peterson and James Stanlaw), p. 59

October 2004. Volume 45. Issue 7. “Noam Chomsky On Language and Politics” (James Stanlaw), pp. 58-59

No Section News in Volume 45. Issue 6.

May 2004. Voilume 45. Issue 5. “Language of Hate” (Mark Allen Peterson and James Stanlaw), pp. 55-56

April 2004. Volume 45. Issue 4. “Inaccessible Data Mean Lost Langauges, and a Lost Language is as Good as Dead” (James Stanlaw), pp. 51-52

March 2004. Volume 45. Issue 3. “Report on SLA Business Meeting” (Mark Allen Peterson and James Stanlaw), p. 51

February 2004. Volume 45. Issue 2. “Graffiti Photos: Language and Art in Japanese Girls’ Culture” (Laura Miller), pp. 51-52

January 2004. Volume 45. Issue 1. “The Globalization of Hate” (Mark Allen Peterson), p. 60

 

2003

December 2003. Volume 44. Issue 9. “The English Language and American Identity: Views from Native and Non-Native Speakers” (Joy Bhosai and Nicole Clarke), p.52

November 2003. Volume 44. Issue 8. “The Metaphor of ‘Endangered Languages” (P. Kevin Friedman), p. 63

October 2003. Volume 44. Issue 7. Untitled (Mark Allen Peterson and James Stanlaw), p. 55

No Section News in September 2003. Volume 44. Issue 6

May 2003. Volume 44. Issue 5. “Linguistic Moments in the Movies” (Mark Allen Peterson and James Stanlaw), pp. 51-52

April 2003. Volume 44. Issue 4. “To Be (Online) or Not to Be (Online) … Is THAT the Question?” (James Stanlaw and Mark Peterson), p.. 50-51

March 2003. Volume 44. Issue 3. “Language Components” (Mark Allen Peterson and James Stanlaw), pp. 48-49

February 2003. Volume 44. Issue 2. “Down to Business” (Mark Allen Peterson and James Stanlaw), p. 51

January 2003. Volume 44. Issue 1. “Building Bridges” (Mark Allen Peterson and James Stanlaw), pp. 51-52

 

2002

December 2002. Volume 43. Issue 9. “Is ‘Like’ Liable to be a Liability in Language?” (James Stanlaw and Mark Peterson), pp. 55-56

November 2002. Volume 43. Issue 8. “Linguistic Aspects of American Politics” (James Stanlaw and Mark Peterson), pp. 59-60

October 2002. Volume 43. Issue 7. “SSILA Withdraws from AAA Meeting” (Mark Allen Peterson and James Stanlaw) p. 55

No Section News in September 2002. Volume 43. Issue 6.

May 2002. Volume 43. Issue 5. “Linguistic Moments in the Movies” (Mark Allen Peterson and James Stanlaw), pp. 55-56

April 2002. Volume 43. Issue 4. Untitled (Interview with Monica Heller) (James Stanlaw and Mark Peterson), pp. 55-56

March 2002. Volume 43. Issue 3. “A Letter on Sept 11” (James Stanlaw and Mark Peterson) p. 55-56

February 2002. Volume 43. Issue 2. “New AN Contributing Editor” (James Stanlaw and Mark Peterson), pp. 55-56

January 2002. Volume 43. Issue 1. “AILLA” (Richard J. Senghas and James Stanlaw), pp. 53-54

 

2001

December 2001. Volume 42. Issue 9. Untitled (Interview with Mary Bucholtz and Elizabeth Keating) (James Stanlaw and Richard Senghas), p. 55

November 2001. Voilume 42. Issue 8. “Linguistics at the Annual Meeting” (Richard Senhas and James Stanlaw), pp. 63-64

October 2009. Volume 42. Issue 7. “Nu Shu” (Richard Senghas and James Stanlaw), pp. 54-55

September 2001. Volume 42. Issue 6. “Collins Named SLA Board Member” (Richard J. Senhas and James Stanlaw), pp. 58-59

May 2001. Volume 42. Issue 5. Untitled (Interview with Jane Hill) (Richard Senghas and James Stanlaw), pp. 55-56

No SLA Column in April 2001. Volume 42. Issue 4. Section News

March 2001. Volume 42. Issue. 3. Untitled (Interview with George Lakoff) (Richard Senghas and James Stanlaw), pp. 55-56

February 2001. Volume 42. Issue 2. Looking Ahead to AAA2001 (Richard J. Senghas and James M. Stanlaw), p. 55

January 2001. Volume 42. Issue 1. Untitled (Section Business) (Cyndi Dunn and Richard Senghas), p. 60

 

2000

December 2000. Volume 41. Issue 9. “Lavender Languages IX” (Richard J Senghas and Cyndi Dunn), pp. 56-57

December 2000. Volume 41. Issue 9. “Paradoxes of Public Silence” (Elizabeth Spreng), p. 57

November 2000. Volume 41. Issue 8. “Looking Forwad to the Annual Meeting” (Cyndi Dunn and Richard J. Senghas), pp. 69-70

October 2000. Volume 41. Issue 7. “Preview of SLA Sessions- Part I” (Richard J Senghas and Cyndio Dunn), p. 69

October 2000. Volume 41. Issue 7. “Preview of Invited Sessions” (Laura Miller), p. 70

September 2000. Volume 41. Issue 6. “Deadline for Best Student Paper Award” and “Call for Nominations for AAA and SLA Elections” (Cyndi Dunn and Richard J Senghas), p. 117

September 2000. Volume 41. Issue 6. “Language Rights and the AAA Committee for Human Rights” (John B Haviland), p. 117

September 2000. Volume 41. Issue 6. “New Electronic Discussion List on Code-Switching” (Cyndi Dunn and Richard J Senghas), p. 117

May 2000. Volume 41. Issue 5. “SLA Student Paper Competition and Language Revitalization” (Richard J Senghas and Cyndi Dunn), 77-78

May 2000. Volume 41. Issue 5. “Language and Metaphor” (John McCreery), p. 78

April 2000. Volume 41. Issue 4. “Linguistic Anthropology 2000” (Charles Briggs), pp. 33-34

March 2000. Volume 41. Issue 3. “Untitled Section Business” (Richard Senghas and Cyndi Dunn), p. 72

March 2000. Volume 41. Issue 3. “Eeny Meeny Miny Mo” (Jesse Lee), p. 72-73

February 2000. Volume 41. Issue 2. “Conference Announcements” (Cyndi Dunn and Richard Senghas), pp. 71-72

February 2000. Volume 41. Issue 2. “Sociolinguistics and Anthropology in New Zealand” (Yukako Sunaoshi), p. 72

January 2000. Volume 41. Issue 1. “Informal Annual Meeting Report” (Richard Senghas), pp. 95-97

 


 

 

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September 1984. Volume 25. Issue 6. “SLA By-Laws” (Jane Hill) 1984_09


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