More on Haitian Kreyòl and the education system

Some interesting comments on the education system in general in a New York Times Editorial on Haitian Education These comments were posted in response to the Petition to have textbooks in Kreyòl in the schools (the last post on this SLA Blog): Nancy Reyes says Are you implying that Haitian kids are dumber than kids whose first language is Catalan, Swiss dialect, Cebuano or Karanga but have to study books written in the language of the majority (Spanish, German, Tagalog, Shona)? For younger kids, immersion works,In Africa, the teacher speaks slowly and explains things in the local language when they

Linguistic Anthropology Roundup #7

Arizona on Our Minds Arizona lawmakers have been on our minds, recently. In Roundup #5, Leila talked about their ban on ethnic studies classes and move against teachers with accents. As should be expected, that same “accented speech” issue has attracted the attention of the good people at Language Log, for instance in this recent blogpost. Among other things, this issue could help us discuss the perceived relationship between accent and fluency. Judgments about speech are often connected to judgments about speakers and accent perception is a fascinating (though often troubling) dimension of this connection. In Roundup #6, Chad provided

Letter to the Census Bureau

On May 27, AAA President Virginia Dominguez sent a letter to the Census Bureau regarding its language questions and classifications, which you can find through AAA Challenges Questions on US Census and the AAA homepage. The letter was written by the newly constituted SLA Committee on Language and Social Justice, which partners with the AAA Committee on Human Rights (CfHR). It suggests several alternatives for the classification of speakers who live in households where no one over the age of 14 speaks English “very well” as “linguistically isolated.” This is a follow up to the AAA’s 2007 AAA resolution (seeStatement