Directions for Signing up for the LSJ Committee Listserv

December 22, 2016 No Comments Mariam Durrani Language and Social Justice

Prepared by: Netta Avineri, Susan D Blum, Hilary Parsons Dick, and Robin Conley Riner About the Listserv The Language & Social Justice (LSJ) listserv is a valuable tool for networking and keeping up with activities, information, and issues related to the LSJ, as well as in the field of language and social justice more broadly. It also provides a discussion forum for professional topics, a means for exchanging relevant news, and a venue for critical dialogue about members’ language and social justice efforts. The LSJ is open to any scholar with an interest in the topics of discussion. Members may

Language and Social Justice Task Force events at #AAA2016

Please see below a list of events that the Language and Social Justice Task Force is sponsoring and/or participating in at this year’s AAAs in Minneapolis. We hope to see you all there! If you are involved in a panel or event that you think would be of interest to LSJ members, send an email to Robin (conleyr@marshall.edu). Best, The LSJ Core Members 1. Language and Social Justice Task Force Meeting Saturday, Nov. 19, 12:15-1:30 pm All are welcome!! 2. SLA Presidential Conversation on Multilingual Education and Social Justice Thursday, November 17, 12:15-1:30 pm Patricia Baquedano-Lopez Mexican and Central American

Update on the SLA Committee for Language and Social Justice

December 13, 2015 1 Comment Diego Arispe-Bazán (SLA Web Assistant) Announcements, In the news, JLA, Language and Social Justice, SLA

Core Committee Established The SLA Committee for Language and Social Justice has now established its core committee, and is proud to welcome the new core committee members, Susan Blum and Hilary Dick. The Society for Linguistic Anthropology thanks Daniel Suslak and Patricia Baquedano-Lopez for their service on the LSJ committee. They have helped make the work for the LSJ Committee more visible and relevant to current debates and issues of social discrimination. If you are interested in participating in LSJ initiatives and campaigns, please contact Netta Avineri navineri@gmail.com or Robin Conley conleyr@marshall.edu to be added to the google group list. Recent posts about Language and Social Justice [Sports Mascots] 

SLA Committee on Language and Social Justice Call for Volunteers (open through November 25)

November 7, 2015 No Comments Diego Arispe-Bazán (SLA Web Assistant) AAA, Announcements, Language and Social Justice, Positions, SLA

[Edit 9 December 2015] The SLA Committee for Language and Social Justice has now established its core committee. Individuals who are interested in participating in LSJ initiatives and campaigns may contact Netta Avineri navineri@gmail.com or Robin Conley conleyr@marshall.edu to be added to the google group list.   The SLA Nominations Committee is currently seeking volunteers to serve as a core committee member on the SLA Committee for Language and Social Justice (LSJ). The LSJ committee was created in 2009 out of the Task Group on Language and Social Justice and is a standing committee within SLA. There are currently four

AN News: “Indian Mascots: Naturalized Racism and Anthropology” by Bernard C. Perley (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee)

Anthropology News Article The month of September ushers in another season of professional football. Native Americans across the country will have to endure yet another year of public humiliation. The professional football team from Washington DC continues to use their racist moniker with impunity. How is it, in the Nation’s capital, such a public display of racist language can continue to be defended as honorific discourse presumed to elevate the public imagination of the entire population of the Indigenous peoples of North America? This is a social imaginary unworthy of a nation that purports to endorse the best values of

AN News: “Silent Meditation: Speech, power, and social justice” by the Committee on Language & Social Justice

April 14, 2015 No Comments annab AAA, Anthropology News Columns, Language and Social Justice, SLA

Anthropology News Article by Netta Avineri, Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey; Jena Barchas-Lichtenstein, Independent Scholar; Robin Conley, Marshall University; Mariam Durrani, University of Pennsylvania; Kathleen Riley, Fordham University The AAA Committee for Human Rights Task Group/Society for Linguistic Anthropology Committee on Language & Social Justice is committed to collaborating with one another to provide a unique, linguistic anthropological perspective on relevant issues of the day. We believe that a merging of voices allows for greater depth of reflection, listening, and revision. In this way our process in the Task Group is symbolic of our greater ideals – a

Anthropology News: “Language and Social Justice Committee Activities, 2013-14” (Bonnie Urciuoli)

June 27, 2014 1 Comment Diego Arispe-Bazán (SLA Web Assistant) Anthropology News Columns, Language and Social Justice, SLA

The latest Anthropology News features an article from Bonnie Urciuoli entitled, “Language and Social Justice Committee Activities, 2013-14.” You can access the article on the Anthropology News website by clicking here, or by copying and pasting this link into your web browser: http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/2014/06/25/language-and-social-justice-committee-activities-2013-14/  

The Verbal Artistry of Julius Malema

LANGUAGE AND CULTURE The Verbal Artistry of Julius Malema From the Anthro News Blog Language and Culture Column. Guest Columnist Steven P. Black Steven P. Black, Department of Anthropology, Rutgers University In November of 2011, political youth leader Julius Malema was suspended from the ruling party of South Africa, the African National Congress (ANC). The ANC, once a primary force of organized resistance to the racist and oppressive governance known as Apartheid, refashioned itself with the guidance of Nelson Mandela into a party for non-racial government. Though the ANC is officially committed to non-racial democracy, not all of the party’s

Educating Tibetans in Tibetan?

A Fork in the Chinese Road: Educating Tibetans in Tibetan? Susan D. Blum December 23, 2011 Earlier this month a Tibetan monk set himself on fire. It was the twelfth incidence of Tibetan self-immolation by a monk or nun since March, according to unverified but plausible reports. These acts of desperation continue a long line of protests in China despite the Chinese government’s unyielding determination to keep Tibetans in line. What is called by protestors “cultural genocide” has many dimensions, not the least of which is language. When people’s religion, subsistence, and very language are attacked as unworthy, there are

Occupying Language

H. Samy Alim writing in the NY Times about “What if We Occupied Language?” When I flew out from the San Francisco airport last October, we crossed above the ports that Occupy Oakland helped shut down, and arrived in Germany to be met by traffic caused by Occupy Berlin protestors. But the movement has not only transformed public space, it has transformed the public discourse as well. Occupy. It is now nearly impossible to hear the word and not think of the Occupy movement. Even as distinguished an expert as the lexicographer and columnist Ben Zimmer admitted as much this

JLA “Racializing Discourses”

Journal of Linguistic Anthropology special issue, “Racializing Discourses,” now available online! Misty Jaffe and Paul Garrett are very pleased to announce the publication of the first-ever online issue of JLA. (Further information about JLA online issues is available here.) Guest-edited and with an introduction by Hilary Dick and Kristina Wirtz, this special themed issue includes articles by Kristina Wirtz (“Cuban Performances of Blackness as the Timeless Past Still Among Us”); Hilary Dick (“Making Immigrants Illegal in Small-Town USA”); Stanton Wortham, Elaine Allard, Kathy Lee & Katherine Mortimer (“Racialization in Payday Mugging Narratives”); Ryan Blanton (“Chronotopic Landscapes of Environmental Racism”); and

For Ebonics, the New Milennium Is Pretty Much Like the Old One

Language and Culture (Anthro News Blog) I am delighted to announce the launch of the Language and Culture column on the Anthropology News blog. Jacqueline Messing, Richard Senghas and I will be sharing editorial duties for the blog for the coming year. My first act as co-editor was to ask Ronald Kephardt for an update on Ebonics and am really pleased he agreed to participate. His column is below. The original piece on the blog is at: http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/2011/09/22/for-ebonics-the-new-milennium-is-pretty-much-like-the-old-one-draft Do drop by and leave a comment or give the piece some stars! All readers of this blog are also invited to think

Letter to the Census Bureau from the SLA Committee on Language and Social Justice

January 21, 2011 No Comments Leila AAA, In the news, Language and Social Justice

January 5, 2011 David S. Johnson, Division Chief Housing and Household Economic Statistics U.S. Census Bureau 4600 Silver Hill Road Washington, DC 20233 Dear Mr. Johnson, Thank you for your Dec 22, 2010 response to our May 27, 2010 letter concerning the Census Bureau’s use of the term “linguistically isolated.” Speaking on behalf of the Association and its Task Group on Language and Social Justice, I am very encouraged to learn that you have been considering alternatives to this inaccurate classification, and hope that the elimination of this term will be implemented in next year’s data cycle. Thanks to your

Increasing number of US students study ASL

According to an article in the New York Times, American Sign Language is now the fourth most-studied language among US college and university students. While enrollment in foreign-language courses generally has held steady or increased only modestly, enrollment in ASL courses increased more than sixteen percent between 2006 and 2009. Instructor Amy Ruth McGraw suggests that students may switch to ASL after struggling to learn other languages. But if the cause of their difficulty “was memorizing vocabulary and grammar,” McGraw points out, “this isn’t going to be any better.” For information on academic research of American Sign Language since the

The Naming of Africa

Steven Black, UCSD

This morning (Sept. 20, 2010) while drinking my coffee I did a perfunctory survey of the news on Africa, only to be jolted out of my pre-coffee stupor by an article on cnn.com with the title, “Group: Use of ‘Sub-Saharan Africa’ Disparaging.” This immediately concerned me. While I prefer to describe ‘southern Africa’ generally or ‘South Africa’ specifically, I myself have unquestioningly used the term ‘sub-Saharan’ in past work in order to indicate the boundary of Arabic-dominant cultural practices. Some academics prefer the (inevitably more bulky) phrase, “Africa south of the Sahara,” but I wonder if this shift in terminology is really enough for the phrase to point to a different set of indexical meanings.

Susan DiGiacomo on Catalan

Reposted comment by Susan M. DiGiacomo John Tagliabue’s New York Times article on the new Catalan law mandating the dubbing and/or subtitling of 50% of foreign films into Catalan (“Trumpeting Catalan on the Big Screen,” March 10, 2010) contains a number of inaccuracies and tendentious arguments not easily recognized as such by the uninformed reader. Catalonia is represented as a place where all things Spanish are subjected to nationalistic backlash: Catalan schoolchildren are “required by law” to receive their education in the Catalan language, and the Catalan Parliament, “in a further blow to Spanish culture,” was poised to end bullfighting

Michel DeGraff on Haitian Kreyòl

Comments by Michel DeGraff on responses to his petition on Haitian Kreyòl As it turns out, these responses echo age-old arguments about the (mis)use of language in Haitian schools and in Haitian society at large. Yves Dejean and many others have addressed such arguments in previous publications. See, for example, Yves Dejean’s 2006 book _Yon lekòl tèt anba nan yon lekòl tèt anba_. As shown in Dejean’s publications, many of these counter-arguments against his petition have been made made and un-made over and over again. Unfortunately my current schedule won’t allow time to engage in these discussions. The good news

DEA and Ebonics

Repost of an article by H. Samy Alim and Imani Perry originally written for the The Grio blog: http://www.thegrio.com/opinion/why-the-deas-embrace-of-ebonics-is-lost-in-translation.php When the headlines appeared this week that the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) had issued a request to hire up to nine linguists proficient in Ebonics, it appeared it might be yet another cruel joke about the language of African-Americans. After all, who can forget the onslaught of racist “humor” and the angry vitriolic comments that circulated internationally after the “Oakland Ebonics controversy” a little over a decade ago. The DEA may not have known the full ramifications of its decision to

Haitian Kreyòl and Catalan

Reposted from Celso Alvarez Cáccamo 2010/08/24 at 3:13 am Catalonia’s educational system is one of immersion in Catalan. Catalan- and Spanish-speaking children alike (as well as immigrants from other countries) learn mandatorily in Catalan; Spanish is also taught. Spanish is not “the language of the majority” in Catalonia (or Galiza, for that matter). Be as it may, quantitative data about language distribution is only one of the criteria for language policies. The relevant criterium in Catalonia is that Catalan is the historical language of the country. As for the Haitian case and the petition, my opinion is that the various